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How Schools Use Brain Science To Help Traumatized Kids Heal and Learn

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Positive Parenting Tips – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

As a parent you give your children a good start in life—you nurture, protect and guide them. Parenting is a process that prepares your child for independence. As your child grows and develops, there are many things you can do to help your child. These links will help you learn more about your child’s development, positive parenting, safety, and health at each stage of your child’s life.

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Developmental Milestones for Children – CDC

January 2018

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye bye” are called developmental milestones. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, act, and move (crawling, walking, etc.).

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MyPre-K (in Kentucky)

January 2018

My Pre-K is for parents, caregivers, and anyone in Kentucky looking for an easy way to find programs and opportunities in their community before entering Kindergarten.

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Trauma Informed Community Building Evaluation

At its core, Trauma Informed Community Building (TICB) aims to increase the readiness of the community to sustain personal and
neighborhood change. TICB strives to promote social cohesion and foster resiliency so that residents will have the capacity to adjust to changing circumstances, including the transition to a mixed-income neighborhood. Informed by the socio-ecological model, TICB acknowledges the interplay of
individual, interpersonal, community and system level factors on residents’ experiences, and aims to simultaneously target each of these levels in all aspects of community building efforts (Weinstein, Wolin, & Rose, 2014).

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Trauma Informed Community Building

Pervasive current and historical trauma demands a community building approach that takes into account residents’ emotional needs and avoids
re-traumatization triggers, which “traditional” models of community building may ignore or exacerbate. Just as a “trauma informed approach” is now
accepted as essential for effective service delivery to many individuals living in these communities (SAMHSA, 2012), a trauma informed approach to
community building is required to create sustainable improvements to their social and physical environment.

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Embedding the Brain Story: To Catalyze Sustainable Change For Children And Families

The Alberta Family Wellness Initiative has targeted key leverage points across all the major systems, addressing early childhood development and its connection to later physical and mental health outcomes, including addiction.

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Trauma-Sensitive School Checklist

A traumasensitive school is a safe and respectful environment that enables students to build caring relationships with adults and peers, self-regulate their emotions and behaviors, and succeed academically, while supporting their physical health and well-being.

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Supporting Students Experiencing Childhood Trauma: Tips for Parents and Educators

Schools have a unique opportunity and responsibility to help these children recover from trauma and develop the skills necessary to experience academic and social success. This begins with educating school personnel on trauma and effective interventions.

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Restorative Practices: A Guide for Educators

Educators across the nation recognize the importance of fostering positive, healthy school climates and helping students learn from their mistakes. Increasingly, they are partnering with parents, students, district officials, community organizations, and policymakers to move away from harmful and counter-productive zero-tolerance discipline policies and toward proven restorative approaches to addressing conflict in schools

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Project AWARE Ohio: Advancing Wellness and Resilience in Education

Project AWARE Ohio is a partnership between the Ohio Department of Education, the Center for School Based-Mental Health Programs at Miami University and the educational service centers within three pilot communities: Cuyahoga County, Warren County and Wood County. Funded through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Project AWARE Ohio supports schools and communities in:

  • Raising awareness of behavioral health issues among school-aged youth;
  • Providing training to detect and respond to mental health challenges and crisis in children and young adults; and
  • Increasing access to behavioral health supports for children, youth and families.
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Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators

The Child Trauma Toolkit for Educators was developed to provide school administrators, teachers, staff, and concerned parents with basic information about working with traumatized children in the school system.

Research suggests that approximately 25% of American children will experience at least one traumatic event by the age of 16. A child’s reactions to trauma can interfere considerably with learning and/or behavior at school. However, schools also serve as a critical system of support for children who have experienced trauma.

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Activities Guide: Enhancing and Practicing Executive Function Skills with Children from Infancy to Adolescence

Executive function and self-regulation (EF/SR) skills provide critical supports for learning and development, and while we aren’t born with these skills, we are born with the potential to develop them through interactions and practice. Each chapter of this guide contains activities suitable for a different age group, from infants to teenagers.

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Adverse Childhood Experiences: Assessing The Impact On Health And School Engagement And The Mitigating Role Of Resilience

Using the 2011–12 National Survey of Children’s Health, we assessed the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences and associations between them and factors affecting children’s development and lifelong health. After we adjusted for confounding factors, we found lower rates of school engagement
and higher rates of chronic disease among children with adverse childhood experiences.

We found higher rates of school engagement among children with adverse childhood experiences who demonstrated resilience, as well as higher rates of resilience among children with such experiences who received care in a family-centered medical home.

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Adverse Childhood Experiences and Mental Health, Chronic Medical Conditions, and Development in Young Children

To determine the relationships between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and mental health, chronic medical conditions, and social development among young children in the child welfare system. This cross-sectional study used a nationally representative sample of children investigated by child welfare (National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II) from 2008 to 2009.

ACEs were associated with poor early childhood mental health and chronic medical conditions, and, among children aged 3 to 5, social development.

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Using Brain Science to Create New Pathways Out of Poverty

Experiences of social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma can directly undermine brain development and the EF skills most needed for success. The areas of the brain affected by adverse experiences of social bias, persistent poverty, and trauma remain plastic well into adulthood and, through proper coaching, may be strengthened and improved.

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Strong at the Broken Places: The Resiliency of Low-Income Parents

By examining factors that promote or hinder children’s healthy development, this policy report draws on recent studies to illustrate the importance of parent resiliency in the development of social-emotional competence among low-income children. The report concludes with program and policy recommendations that have proven effective in promoting the development of protective factors, reducing vulnerabilities, and cultivating resiliency among low-income parents and, consequently, their children.

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Early Stress Gets under the Skin: Promising Initiatives to Help Children Facing Chronic Adversity

Many children experience adversity in the form of poverty, abuse or neglect, homelessness, or other conditions that make them vulnerable to the damaging effects of chronic stress. New research reveals that chronic stress alters their rapidly developing biological systems in ways that undermine their ability to succeed in school and in life. The good news is that we have strong evidence for programs and approaches that policy makers could use to help these children overcome the effects of stress.

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Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience

This report offers a groundbreaking framework for understanding the relationship between community trauma and violence. Until now, there has been no basis for understanding how community trauma undermines both individual and community resilience, especially in communities highly impacted by violence, and what can be done about it.

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Helping Traumatized Children Learn: Creating and Advocating for Trauma-Sensitive Schools

As a follow up to Helping Traumatized Children Learn: A Report and Policy Agenda, this hopes to move beyond awareness of trauma’s impacts on learning to help schools become trauma-sensitive learning environments that can improve educational outcomes for all students

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Helping Traumatized Children Learn: A Report and Policy Agenda

 

A collaboration among educators, parents, mental health professionals, community groups, and attorneys determined to help children experiencing the traumatic effects of exposure to family violence succeed in school.

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Three Principles to Improve Outcomes for Children and Families (Center on Developing Child, Harvard University)

The science of child development and the core capabilities of adults point to a set of “design principles” that policymakers and practitioners in many different sectors can use to improve outcomes for children and families. That is, to be maximally effective, policies and services should:

  • Support responsive relationships for children and adults.
  • Strengthen core life skills.
  • Reduce sources of stress in the lives of children and families

These three principles can guide decision-makers as they choose among policy alternatives, design new approaches, and shift existing practice in ways that will best support building healthy brains and bodies.

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Consortium for Resilient Young Children

The Consortium for Resilient Young Children brings together the best of Early Childhood and Mental Health practices. Historically, these two disciplines have operated without integration. The Consortium promotes best practices related to quality child care and access to children’s mental health services.

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Trauma Toolbox for Primary Care

September 2017

Helping Foster and Adoptive Families Cope With Trauma: A Guide for Pediatricians

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San Diego Unified Transitions Toward a Trauma-Informed School District

October 2015

A school administrator adopts trauma-informed approach where staff members strive to meet the emotional and physical needs of children in addition to their academic needs

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Supreme Court of Ohio: Juvenile Court Trauma-Informed Practices

February 2017

The Supreme Court of Ohio’s updated practices through a trauma-focused lense (considering trauma in children)

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The Foundations of Lifelong Health Are Built in Early Childhood

July 2010

Reevaluates the health dimension of early childhood policy by showcasing the developmental needs of young children is as much about building a strong foundation for lifelong physical and mental health as it is about enhancing readiness to succeed in school

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Early Childhood Adversity, Toxic Stress, and the Role of the Pediatrician: Translating Developmental Science Into Lifelong Health

January 2012

As trusted authorities in child health and development, pediatric providers must now complement the early identification of developmental concerns with a greater focus on those interventions and community investments that reduce external threats to healthy brain growth.

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The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

May 1998

The original ACE Study – Relationship of Childhood Abuse and Household Dysfunction to Many of the Leading Causes of Death in Adults

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CDC Overview of Kaiser ACE Study Overview

June 2016

Highlights from the CDC about Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, one largest investigations of childhood abuse and neglect and later-life health and well-being

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Child Care and Early Education for Children Who Have Experienced Trauma: Research-to-Policy Resources

January 2017

Identifies resources in the Research Connections collection published in the past 10 years that examine the role child care and early education can play in both preventing traumatic experiences and in supporting children who have experienced or are at risk of experiencing trauma

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The secret ingredient that helps kids overcome the toxic stress of poverty

April 2017

Tangible examples of the importance of building resiliency in children. Teachable factors that appear to help make a child resilient rather than at-risk

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How Childhood Trauma Affects Health Across a Lifetime

September 2014

Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues (ACEs) has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain.

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